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A Patient's Bill of Rights
 

■ First adopted in 1973 by the American Hospital Association, A Patient's Bill of Rights was revised on October 21,1992

 

■ Sets forth an expectation of treatment and care that will allow for improved collaboration between patients, health care providers, and institutions resulting in better patient care. (American Hospital Association [revised] 1992)

 

Informed Consent

 

■ Every adult person has the right to decide what can and cannot be done to his or her own body (Schloendorff v. Society of New York Hospital, 105 NE 92 [NY 1914]).

 

■ Assumes a person is capable of making an informed decision about own health care. M State regulations vary, but mental illness does not mean that a person is or should be assumed incapable of making decisions related to his or her own care.

 

■ Patients have a right to:

  • Information about their treatment and any procedures
     

              to be performed.

  •  
    Know the inherent risks and benefits.

■ Without this information (specific information, risks, and benefits) a person cannot make an informed decision.The above also holds true for those who might participate in research. (Laben & Crofts Yorker 1998)

 

 

Right to Refuse Treatment/Medication

 

■ Just as a person has the right to accept treatment, he or she also has the right to refuse treatment to the extent permitted by the law and to be informed of the medical consequences of his/her actions.

 

■ In some emergency situations, a patient can be medicated or treated against his/her will, but state laws vary, and so it is imperative to become knowledgeable about applicable state laws. (American Hospital Association [revised] 1992; Laben & Crofts Yorker 1998)