Skip to main content

Welcome and thank you for visiting our Website. For any suggestions, updates, additions or errors, please contact Amede Kyubwa, MA, MPA @ info@sacpros.org

SACPROS  Magazine  Find a Doctor   EMERGENCY   HOSPITALS  Providers  GROUPS   AOD   CLINICS    JOBS  PROFESSIONALS  HOUSING  OTHER  WHY?   
NOMINATION 2013
ADVERTISING
Articles for Summer 2012
Advertising Contract
For All Mental Health Workers
Living My Life with a Mental
PRESS RELEASE 3.21.11
Magazine Seeking Sponsors
Sponsorship Opportunities
About Empowerment Mag
Resiliency Factor
Commission-based
Get Mentioned in Upcoming
Freelance Volunteer contributors
Placing an AD
Winter 2011 Issue
SUMMER 2011 ISSUE
SUMMER 2011 ISSUE FILES
Working with Your Psychiatrist
Help Spread the Word
Contentment and Happiness
Interview with Dr.Hashem
vision of Empowerment Mag
Fall 2011 Issue
Join the Editorial Team
Thinking Fresh & Eating Clean
Fall 2011 Issue is Out Now
DISTRIBUTION
FALL 2011 Issue
Who Makes the Empowerment
The Future of Psychiatry
One Last Reminder
Summer 2012 Cover Draft
EM 2012
Music Therapy
TLCS’ HOPE Line
How to Get The Sleep You
Summer Tips for Parents o
Managing Your Persistent
A Mental and Emotional To
Being Grateful for a Diag
What’s “Growing” On In Yo
Mending Your Teen’s Broke
Fostering Healthy Self-Es
Helping Your Teen Transit
The Ruin
Guiding Wisdoms to Promot
A REVIEW OF TECHNIQUES IN
MANAGING THE FEAR AND ANX
NEVER LOSE HOPE IN DEALIN
WHEN SOMEONE YOU KNOW STR
ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE ABU
Looking for a Printing Co
Leaving the Journey from
Readership Survey 2013
Tips for Sharing Your Sto
CoOccurringDisorders

Music Therapy

Submitted to the Empowerment Magazine by David Kiesz

 

Only four of California’s thousands of colleges offer a music therapy degree.  One of those places is University Of The Pacific in Stockton.  I visited a counselor, a student, and spoke with a Sacramento based graduate of that school.  The value of music for reminiscence purposes and for children to learn classical instruments is well known, but according to these three people, those are only the tip of the iceberg. 

 

The terms Vibro/Neuroacoustic and Brainwave Entrainment are just two of many scientific practices music therapists use. Music therapy has been shown to have physiological effects on heart-rate, blood pressure, immune system response, pain relief, neurological function, and emotional and physical healing.  Adherents claim it is the equivalent of Ativan for relaxation and ibuprofen for pain, and hardcore adherents claim much more.

In his work with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, Doctor Oliver Sacks (portrayed by Robin Williams in ‘Awakenings’) said:

 

“When I inspect a medical book for possible reading, the first thing I do is check the index for a chapter on music as healing, and if the book contains none, I close the book”.        

 

For me the author, vocal and instrumental music helped end a five year hospitalization and started my life over at age 40.  There was a music therapist at the state hospital where I resided and she made it pivotal in my recovery.

In March 2012, my close friend had a stroke leaving her paralyzed and her speech unusable.   As I visited her in the hospital, I spoke directly and slowly, believing she understood every word I was saying.  She responded with a slight smile and an obvious twinkle in her eyes.  Her son was in tears as he told me my visit elicited the most obvious response from his mom to date.  The reason I even mention this is I promised to come back and play music for her. 

What a learning experience it was to be!   I played too many tear jerker songs and not enough up-beat songs.  My friend had already wept internally much.  Thankfully her husband dropped hints to end my session early.  Next time I’ll keep it more upbeat.


In working with members of the mental health community, I’ve seen dozens take their own music (and poetry and comedy) from personal edification to public performance.  The therapeutic value is obvious.  It got them out of isolation and defeatism and built confidence. 

One such person attributes music to saving his marriage and staying clean and sober.  He had unsuccessfully tried   12- step programs, medication, talk therapy and church.  What level of music therapy are you interested in and where can it be found in Sacramento?  Try your own family, church, school, music store, mental health center, community orchestra and choir, and licensed music therapist.  My outlet is the Consumers Self-Help Wellness/Recovery Center North, 3815 Marconi Ave (916) 485-4175, where a music/sing-a-long group happens twice a month.